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Where Film Noir Lives...Too!

Film noir is a cinematic term used primarily to describe stylish Hollywood crime dramas, particularly those that emphasize cynical attitudes and sexual motivations. Hollywood's classical film noir period is generally regarded as extending from the early 1940s to the late 1950s. Film noir of this era is associated with a low-key black-and-white visual style that has roots in German Expressionist cinematography. Many of the prototypical stories and much of the attitude of classic noir derive from the hardboiled school of crime fiction that emerged in the United States during the last depression.

The term film noir, French for "black film,"[1] first applied to Hollywood films by French critic Nino Frank in 1946, was unrecognized by most American film industry professionals of that era.[2] Cinema historians and critics defined the category retrospectively. Before the notion was widely adopted in the 1970s, many of the classic films noirs were referred to as melodramas.[a] Whether film noir qualifies as a distinct genre is a matter of ongoing debate among scholars.

ACCORDING TO THE ARTIST...

"First WIP sketch for my Film Noir final. This one will deals with the city as a character, crime in the streets, neon signs and wet streets at night.
The finals will be (hopefully) animated illustrations..."

[editor's note: Follow This Link To See Where The Images Originated... mithia.deviantart.com ]

Film noir encompasses a range of plots: the central figure may be a private eye (The Big Sleep), a plainclothes policeman (The Big Heat), an aging boxer (The Set-Up), a hapless grifter (Night and the City), a law-abiding citizen lured into a life of crime (Gun Crazy), or simply a victim of circumstance (D.O.A.). Although film noir was originally associated with American productions, films now so described have been made around the world. Many pictures released from the 1960s onward share attributes with film noir of the classical period, and often treat its conventions self-referentially. Some refer to such latter-day works as neo-noir. The clichés of film noir have inspired parody since the mid-1940s.

Paul Schrader: Notes on Film Noir...

Paul Schrader: Notes on Film Noir

Tags: buildings, cars, citymrain, dark, film, hotel, noir, seamier, trucks, website

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Kansas City Confidential was the only film made by Edward Small's short-lived Associated Players and Producers, a company formed by Small, Sol Lesser and Sam Briskin.[2][3] It was the first of a thirteen movie deal Small signed with United Artists in 1952, with ten to be made in the first year.[4] John Payne said he owned 25% of the film.[5]

The movie was originally called Kansas City 117, the title based on a police code. Small bought the title Kansas City Confidential off John Gait and Lee Montgomery. It was the first contemporary crime drama Small made after a series of swashbucklers.[6]

Filming started 4 June 1952.It took place partly on Santa Catalina Island, California which stood in for Mexico.[7]

The story begins in Kansas City, but most of the film actually takes place at a fictitious fishing resort in Mexico. Kansas City Confidential was director Karlson's second crime film; he also directed Scandal Sheet, also released in 1952, which proved to be a modest commercial success. Karlson was "a gifted filmmaker who had recently graduated from the Poverty Row studio Monogram"; the film starred John Payne, a "popular crooner of the ’40s who some say was working his way down from Technicolor musicals at 20th Century Fox"[3] but after his Fox contract expired produced several of his own films.

The plot was inspiration for Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs.[8]

Kansas City Confidential From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia...

If you like film noir, Kansas City Confidential is a great movie for you - starring John Payne as a luckless ex-GI who is framed for an armored car robbery. The police beat him up, but he doesn't confess, and eventually he's released for lack of evidence. To clear his name, he sets out to find out who framed him. The trail leads to the seedy side of Tijuana, Mexico where he starts to put the puzzle together.

Kansas City Confidential is an exceptional film, with some of the meanest villains to grace the silver screen, Jack Elam, Neville Brand, and Lee Van Cleef. Grab your popcorn and have a seat.

This copy is an excellent print in HD 720p. And this movie is Public Domain, download it for free at the Internet Archive: https://archive.org/details/KansasCit...

 

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Kansas City Confidential is a 1952 film noir crime film directed by Phil Karlson and starring John Payne, Coleen Gray, Preston Foster, Neville Brand, Lee Van Cleef and Jack Elam. The film was released in the United Kingdom as The Secret Four . Karlson and Payne teamed up a year later for 99 River Street, another noir, followed by a 1955 color film noir, Hell's Island.[1]

This film is now in the public domain.

 

 

[PICTURED: Peter Lorre, actor Dan Duryea...Central...A Portray Of a film-noir Tough Guy... and actress June Vincent in "Black Angel..."

Black Angel is a 1946 film noir, based on the novel The Black Angel by Cornell Woolrich. The film was director Roy William Neill's last film.

Plot

A falsely convicted man's wife, Catherine (June Vincent), and an alcoholic composer and pianist, Martin (Dan Duryea), team up in an attempt to clear her husband of the murder of a blonde singer, who is Martin's wife. Their investigation leads them to face-to-face confrontations with a determined policeman (Broderick Crawford) and a shifty nightclub owner (Peter Lorre), who Catherine and Martin suspect may be the real killer.

Reaction

Dark City: The Film Noir, by Spencer Selby, calls Black Angel: "Important, stylish B-noir, featuring Dan Duryea as the ironic central character."

Writer Cornell Wool-rich

hated this adaption of his story which, aside from the conclusion, differed greatly from his book.

 

The Information Is Courtesy Of Wikipedia...]

FILMNOIRFSTIVAL/A FRENCH WEBSITE...

Dark Websites That I Haunt After Hours...

1...The Film Noir Foundation

The AFI Silver/Films

2...Classicflix

3...The Czar Of Film Noir-author Eddie Muller...

4...Noir-City

5...Cafe-press...The Film Noir Foundation

6...Tony D'Ambra' place...Filmsnoir.net

7...Noir-Whale

8...NOHO Noir...website...

9...Furious-cinema...

10...Sam Juliano and Allan Fish's place Wonders in the Dark

11...YOU WOULD SAY THAT, WOULDN'T YOU?...writer paul d.brazill

12...OutOfTheGutter...

13...psycho noir...Writer Heath Lowrance

14...reneepawlish's website

15...tobecomeawriter...author renee pawlish

16...author kelli stanley

17...snubnosepress...

18...writer Nigel P.Bird...website

19...writer K.A. Laity...

20...writer patti abbott...

21...artist nikkidear.spakat...

22...film-noir-file...D.Hodges

23...thrillingdaysofyesteryear...

24...selbysart...

25...cometastemymind...

26.NoirJournal...

27.Noir-SF...uber

28.CRIME -ALWAYS PAYS...

// In the dark districts of the metropolis, a mysterious serial killer strikes down red dressed women. Del, a crime scene photographer, has lost his own wife in the human hecatomb. Through the silence of the streets at night, he is about to encounter the next victim, followed by a strange man...

NOIR-NATION...



RED (supinfocom 2011 short film) from RED the moviemakers on Vimeo.

// RED is a 2011 psychological thriller short film inspired by "films noirs" and graphic novels produced at Supinfocom Valenciennes.
. Directed by Alexandre Charleux, Amaury Brunet, Ning Zhang and Victoria Bruneel.
. Music by Pierre Caillet.
. Sound design by Rodolphe Kay and Benoît Pallandre.
YOU CAN ALSO VISIT THEIR WEBSITE LOCATED HERE--->
www.redthefilm.com

 

 

No# 30.PARADISE-MYSTERIES...

No# 31. PULP INTERNATIONAL...

No#32.BRIGHT-LIGHTS...AFTER DARK

No#33.CRIME THRILLER GIRL...

No#34.THRILLING DETECTIVE...

No#35.CRIMESPREEMAGAZINE...

No#36.THE MYSTERY BOOKSHELF

No#37.THAT COffEE HOUSE...

No#38.FANDOR...

N0#39.MYSTERIOUS-PRESS...

No#40.THE DANCING IMAGE...

No#41. NOIRENCYCLOPEDIA...

No#42.HITCHCOCK-MASTER...

No#43.CHRISTA FAUST...

No#44.ERIC BEETNER...

No#45.DAVID CRAMMER...

No#46.VINTAGE-TEXTILE...

No#47.CLASSIC MOVIE STILLS...

No#48.BLACKPOOL-PRODUCTION...

No#49.MUSIC IN THE SHADOWS...

BLACKOUT World War II and the Origins of Film Noir Sheri Chinen Bie...

No#50. SECRETDEAD/TUMBLR...

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The Endless Night: A Valentine to Film Noir

"And now, the noirs:THE LETTER (1940, William Wyler. Bette Davis)THE MALTESE FALCON (1941, John…"
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