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Pillow of Death (Universal, 1945). One Sheet (27" X 41"). Horror.
Starring Lon Chaney Jr., Brenda Joyce, J. Edward Bromberg, Rosalind Ivan, Clara Blandick, George Cleveland. Directed by Wallace Fox. An unrestored poster with bright color and a clean overall appearance. It may have general signs of use, such as slight fold separation and fold wear, pinholes, or very minor tears. Please see full-color, enlargeable image [above] for more details. Folded, Very Fine-.There are several Of these posters on the market...However, this one sold for $191.20

 

View movie details on IMDB
View movie details on AllRovi

 

Inner Sanctum Mysteries, a popular old-time radio program that aired from January 7, 1941 to October 5, 1952, was created by producer Himan Brown and was based on the generic title given to the mystery novels of Simon and Schuster.[1] A total of 526 episodes were broadcast.[2]

For additional Information Just Follow The Link To Wikipedia:

Inner Sanctum Mystery...

 


THE DEFINITION Of...

Three Sheet movie posters were large posters usually consisting of 2 pieces which had to be placed together to form one larger piece. These were normally displayed inside the theater lobby on a large wall. These were also shipped folded.

 

Window card movie posters were printed on heavier card stock paper from the 1920s to the mid 1980s. These posters would be placed outside the theaters, in windows of nearby shops and businesses, as a promotional tool. Most window cards had a blank space allocated at the top of the poster for the theater owners to print the date and showtimes of the movies they were promoting.

 

Lobby cards are like posters but smaller, usually 14"×11" (8" x 10" before 1930). Lobby cards are collected and their value depends on their age, quality and popularity. Typically issued in sets of 8 cards, each featuring a different scene from the film with a title card listing the film credits.

 

A daybill is one variety of Australian film poster issued to cinemas at the time of a film's release. A daybill measures approximately 13 x 30 inches.

 

Until the 1970s, most daybills were printed as lithographs. In the 1960s some posters began copying American printing techniques to achieve a 'gloss' finish that suited the photographic images that were becoming prevalent in poster design. Today, daybills are printed on thick glossy paper and are much more durable.

 

Daybills are sought-after by collectors for their rarity and unique artwork. Some of the more famous daybills include:

 

 

Tags: banner, cards, films, information, lobby, memorabilia, movie, posters, window

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THREE SHEET
EXTREMELY RARE COMPARED TO A ONE SHEET. A very large and VERY DESIRABLE vertical format American movie poster. Measuring approx. 41" x 81", almost always issued folded. International versions were sometimes issued. Originally designed to be pasted on small billboards. Studios stopped issuing these in the late 1970's. Roughly three times the size of a one sheet, usually printed in two or more sections that are assembled together for display. This size poster always makes a statement and dominates a room.SIX SHEET

A HUGE American movie poster measuring approximately 81" x 81", roughly six times the size of a one sheet. Produced in 2 or more overlapping sections that are assembled together for display. Almost always folded. EXTREMELY RARE. Very large and cumbersome they are usually printed on a thicker paper than one sheets. Originally designed to be pasted on small billboards. Studios stopped issuing these in the 1970's. This size poster always makes a statement and dominates a room.

Banners come in a variety of sizes. Older ones usually came in a standard size 24" x 82" or 24" x 60". Newer ones come in all different sizes, usually very large 3’ to 4’ in width to 8’ to 12’ in length, either horizontally or vertically. They are usually printed on vinyl or canvas. They can be used either indoors or outdoors due to their weather-resistant nature. Some will come with either reinforced holes, a hanging bar, Velcro and/or other glue adhesive. Banners can be released as advances or regular issues. Their artwork can vary from simplistic to extremely detailed. Although banners occupy a large amount of display space, they are still considered very collectible to movie art collectors. Banners are printed in limited numbers which makes them harder to obtain than other more common sizes. Still used today they are usually shipped rolled.

WINDOW CARD
A vertical format poster, measuring 14" x 22", on thicker stock paper with blank area at top for venue and play dates. Most window cards are unfolded, but some older ones might be folded. Some older cards indicated as used may have a theater name and play date hand lettered on the blank white area at the top of the poster. Since this is how the posters were intended to be used, this is not considered damage by most collectors. Other cards may have had this top portion trimmed off. This trimming does lower the value of the poster.

LOBBY CARD
Lobby cards are no longer used in theaters and are rarely printed for today's films. These small posters on card stock (usually 11" x 14" in a horizontal format) were generally produced in sets of eight, intended for display in a theater's foyer or lobby. A lobby set typically consists of one Title Card, a lobby card of special design usually depicting all key stars, listing credits and intended to represent the entire film rather than a single scene; and seven Scene Cards, each depicting a scene from the movie. There are also Mini Lobby Cards measuring 8 1/2" x 10" (stills).

LOBBY CARD SET
Complete set of lobby cards (usually eight), generally including a Title Card.
[editor's note: Lobby cards are very collectable due to this fact:


Lobby cards are no longer used in theaters and are rarely printed for today's films.

STILLS
Measure 8" x 10". Issued in sets of varying numbers. Sometimes on photo paper, sometimes on card stock similar to lobby cards. Sometimes referred to as Mini Lobby Cards. Used for promotion, they were included sometimes in Press Kits. Very collectible.

DOOR PANEL

Measure 20" x 60". Rarely used today and HIGHLY COLLECTIBLE AND VERY RARE. Printed on both card and paper stock. Issued for major productions or special theatre runs. They were issued alone or in a set of posters (usually a set of four). They usually contained their own unique artwork, normally featuring characters. They were primarily used for display on theatre entrance doors.

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Vintage Movie Posters...This Information Originated Here---> Film-poster @

Original vintage movie posters and movie memorabilia were never meant to be bought or sold. From the birth of cinema, movie posters were loaned or “rented” to movie theaters strictly to be displayed to promote a film, then returned to the film exchange or sent to the next theater on the distribution circuit. Printed on inexpensive paper, movie poster art was never intended to be preserved for posterity. Unlike so-called “limited edition prints” and the glossy reproductions available from numerous sources, original movie posters are the actual theater-used artifacts made and displayed when the film was actually released.

In 1933, one of the darkest years of the Great Depression, a theater owner might receive a 15-cent credit for returning a movie poster to his regional exchange. Compare this figure with the cost of a gallon of gas (18 cents) or a loaf of bread (12 cents) and it’s easy to understand why very few movie posters survived from this period.  If the austerity of the times and the frugality of theater owners was not enough to keep movie posters out of the hands of the general public, the sweeping paper drives of the war years also did their part to help keep movie memorabilia out of general circulation. So it’s no surprise that movie posters from the years of 1930 through 1945 are quite scarce.

In fact, it is estimated that fewer than 20 copies of movie posters exist from most films made during the period of 1930 through 1945.  For many landmark films of the era (e.g., “The Grapes of Wrath”, “Stagecoach”, “The Wizard of Oz”, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs”, “Fury”, “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes”, “Flash Gordon”) it is believed that less than a dozen examples have survived of any particular poster.

Dig deeper into the 1930s and the numbers grow even smaller. For many films produced at the depths of the Depression, only a handful of posters have ever surfaced.  Included in this ultra-rare group are original movie posters for “The Big Trail”, “Tarzan, the Ape Man”, “The Public Enemy”, “Flying Down to Rio”, “The Thin Man”, “Frankenstein”, “Dracula”, “the Bride of Frankenstein”, “I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang”, “King Kong”, “Grand Hotel”, “The Cocoanuts”, “All Quiet on the Western Front”, and numerous others.

From the very beginning movie posters were a part of commerce, designed to get patrons to the box office.  In 1890 a Frenchman named Jules Cheret is credited with producing the very first movie poster, a lithograph designed to promote a short film entitled “Projections Artistiques”. Five years later, a movie poster for the Lumiere Brothers’ “Arrival of a Train” in 1895 was the first to depict an actual scene from the film. However, up until the early 1910s, the majority of early film posters were nothing more than simple “broadside” style signs with little more than block text. A typical poster for an early Edison film contained little more than the movie’s title and the words “Another Edison Photoplay”.

This situation changed rapidly with the birth of the Studio System, and by the mid-1910s such studios as Essanay, Biograph, Vitaphone, Edison and Mutual were each producing their own posters and developing their own unique advertising styles with special border art, title treatment, studio logo, and slogan or “tag-line” to distinguish their quality film from the rest of the pack. In this way, patrons could readily distinguish, for example, between an Edison morality play and a Biograph cliffhanger.

By the mid-1920s the major studios had each developed their own unique style that reflected their output.  Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (founded in 1924), with its Leo the Lion logo and boasting “more stars than there are in heaven”, set the industry standard for movie posters. Befitting its position as top studio, M-G-M often hired established artists and illustrators for its posters, including Al Hirschfeld, John Held Jr., Hap Hadley, Ted Ireland, Louis Fancher, Clayton Knight and Armando Seguso. During the late 1920s through the 1940s, MGM’s movie posters tended to be uncluttered and highly-polished painterly pieces of art, with unusual graphic treatments, often featuring pastel color schemes on white backgrounds.  20th Century Fox (founded as Fox in 1915 and merging with the 20th Century Corporation in 1935) is perhaps best known for elaborate dance features and musical escapism. The studio used brilliant and fanciful stone lithos to promote their product, and their posters are noted for rich lithography and vivid colors. 

Paramount (founded in 1930), with its stable of top stars, produced sleek, witty posters with a minimum of text. By contrast, Warner Bros. (founded in 1923) adopted a starker, punchy, no-frills style of movie poster, often dominated by a photo-montage design, in keeping with their catalog of strong social-realism films. Columbia Pictures, despite its Poverty Row beginnings and no-frills movie-making, employed as vast an art department as any major studio. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s their posters were consistently eye-catching and explosively rich in color. In response to the public’s preference for photographic quality color likenesses of their favorites stars, Columbia pioneered the “fake color” process by which black and white still photos were colorized and turned into poster art, a process quickly adopted by all the other studios.   Universal Studio, founded in 1912, is the oldest in existence.  During the 1920s and 1930s, Universal movie posters were remarkable for their bold color saturation and dynamic composition, with very little white space. It is no coincidence that the posters for their 1930s horror, serial and western movies are among the most highly prized by collectors.

Over the years movie posters have been produced in a dizzying variety of sizes ranging from as small as the handbill-sized heralds and petite midget window cards all the way up to traffic-stopping billboard sized 24-sheets. But the most prevalent size remains the standard one-sheet movie poster poster (roughly 27 inches wide by 40 inches tall) which has remained relatively unchanged since the early days of cinema and is still in use today at your local multiplex. For bigger-budget films, the studios often created “advance” or “teaser” one-sheets that would announce the impending arrival of a film weeks and sometimes months ahead of its theater booking.  For other major releases, the studios often produced several different styles of one-sheet for the same film, one to showcase the action-packed elements of the movie and the other to exploit the romance angle, in hopes of luring a broad cross-section of patrons into the movie theater.  For a more detailed explanation of movie poster sizes and definitions please see the “Poster Sizes” section of this web site.

FILM POSTER-HISTORY ON WIKIPEDIA...

THE WINDOW is a hugely underrated noir with a splendid performance by young Bobby Driscoll.

Hi ! Sam Juliano...

I agree with you, and I know that it was screened at Noir City once...and the film is available on dvd, but it appeared to have been re-mastered...leaving me wishing that the film was  restored and released by one Of the major studios [with extras] ... too !

Sam Juliano, Thanks, for your comment... too !

By the way,

Here goes 2 links  to Tony D'Ambra's website looking at the film...Which I'm sure that you have visited...

New York: Scenes from The Window (1949) Then and Now Read more: htt...

and here--->

The Window (1949): The City as a Prison Read more: http://filmsnoir.net/film_... Under Creative Commons License: Attribution

Yep those are superlative posts by Tony, and well deserve the linking!

I agree with you Sam Juliano... 100 %

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